A Family Dinner.

I was the only one who remembered the oath taking. I was thinking of what dress to wear. I decided on wearing my Mommy’s clothes. She wanted very much for Tish to become a full pledged physician. Melancholic and mushy, I talked to her, that somehow, she would feel the joy of the occasion, each excited beat of the heart transmitted to heaven.

Whoaaah. I asked Jean what she was wearing. and came a clueless answer: for what? The oath taking, I said. A moment of silence. Then the disbelief. That is on Saturday? Aha, I said. And she blasted: Oh no, Ma, I have a talk in the morning, in Pasig, up to eleven, what time is the oath taking? Twelve, call time. Oh no, you go ahead and I will take the Uber.

That was Tuesday.
Then came Wednesday. I received a text.

Ma, it’s oath taking on Saturday, I forgot. Please fetch me Friday night.

Then Friday night came.

What am I to wear?
There are two beige gowns. You can try those.

Saturday morning. The rain dropped heavy in the early morning. Blessings, I prayed.

And sure enough, Tish and I waited at Jazz, where Jean resides, and together, we went to the Philippine International Convention Center.

The Plenary Hall was filled to a capacity. The oath taking was brief, the beeline to the ID and certificate was longer. The event was much a family groupie. I prodded Jean to take pictures of me. What else can we do?

When Tish came, feet blistered, we snapped a few souvenir shots.

Then drove all the way to Bonifacio Global City, away from the buzz, for a quiet dinner.

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My 30th December food fiasco.

My vegetable viand burned and yet again. My daughters had long given up on the food I present them, not that I do not concoct foods well, it’s just that I have this bad habit of leaving my cooking when it is simmering. And when I get back, the pan is black as charcoal. Shucks. And my girls try to salvage whatever is edible. Talk about carcinogen. Sigh.

I am that, and I also don’t like it. I patiently prepared the papaya with shrimp, sauteed in garlic and onions, with a dash of pepper. Would have been a good meal with the marinated boneless bangus, or the danggit that Jean bought from the vendors of Talim Island.

But I turned to throw the peelings out there on my compost, under my now tall and leafy avocado tree. And my greens seemed beckoning, needing a little sprinkle, so I turned on the faucet and showered the droopy plants.

As usual, i got carried away, hopping from pots to flower box, enjoying the feel of the December air…., then I spotted the chopping board I used for the peelings, and remembered my cooking.

I did give it a dash, almost sliding, my flip flops are worn. I didn’t beat the nick of time. The shrimp is in a sorry state. So is the papaya. And the boneless bangus.

I will just wait for Jean to wake up and fry the danggit. That’s what we’re having for breakfast. It is good with vinegar with chili.

By the way, the real red labuyo is harvest from my garden. I still have plenty, if anyone needs some. It’s for free.

— feeling hungry.